I’m having serious doubts about whether it’s a good idea to keep a LinkedIn account

Linked-In LogoRegular readers will know that I’m no great fan of social networking sites. I think they are devious, manipulative, insecure, and can not be trusted with a tenth of the personal data that people entrust to them.

Nevertheless, for about five years I have had an account at LinkedIn. I thought that as long as I only give them the minimum amount of information (about my professional self) then it should be ok. To be honest, the real reason for joining was to increase my credibility as a self-employed person advertising via his website. If I have “x” number of connections on LinkedIn then at least “x” people are saying that they know I exist and that they are not ashamed to be associated with me (at least as far as LinkedIn is concerned).

But a number of things have started happening that I don’t like. These include;

LinkedIn - you may know

This person has suddenly appeared at the top of the list of “people you may know” in my LinkedIn account – just days after I started an email exchange with her.

People showing up on LinkedIn as being “people I may know” that LinkedIn could not possibly have deduced from my current connections. Indeed, LinkedIn don’t suggest they are first, second, or third degree “connections”. I have always scrupulously denied LinkedIn access to my contact lists. And yet, the only thing that a lot of these “people I may know” have in common is that they are, in fact, in my address book. If LinkedIn has obtained my contacts legally then I can only think that they must have bought another service – of which I am a member, and to which I have inadvertently revealed my address book. In any event, I don’t like it. Online services taking over other services and then pooling information about their users is one of the most insidious mis-uses of data online that I can think of.

More and more emails being received from people I don’t know, asking me to “connect with them” on LinkedIn. LinkedIn is not supposed to be like some stupid social networking sites where the aim is to get as many “followers” or “friends” as you can – irrespective of whether you actually know them. It’s supposed to be about business networking. There’s going to be no point in it at all if you can’t trust that the relationships are genuine.

There has been a lot of press about LinkedIn being hacked and about LinkedIn allegedly misusing information gleaned from users’ email accounts. If you suspect that people in your address book have been receiving invitations to join LinkedIn – apparently instigated by you – then do have a look at this link:

LinkedIn customers say Company hacked their email address books

And these pages don’t exactly inspire trust, either:

Your leaked LinkedIn password is now hanging in an art gallery
LinkedIn hack
LinkedIn passwords hacked

A Leaky BucketPerhaps It was one of these episodes that gave rise to a client phoning me last week with the news that her Gmail account had been hacked and her contacts were receiving some very strange email messages that were supposed to have come from her. She said that she had just been exploring LinkedIn (where she has an account) and that this hacking happened just afterwards. I realise that there is no proven connection with LinkedIn, but that doesn’t stop my uneasy feeling about them.

Luckily, the hackers used her Gmail account to send all these strange messages, but they didn’t change her password. The only reason I could think of for this was that they’d got access to so many accounts that they were content with a “one-time use” of her account. We were very, very, lucky. I have tried to recover Gmail accounts from Google before (see this blog on Gmail Passwords) and it can be very difficult. When trying to prove ownership of your hacked account, Google will ask some impossible questions – such as “on what date did you open the account”!

Anyway, in this instance we were able to access the account and change the Gmail password. I’d like to take this opportunity to remind you not to use the same password several times (or similar ones such as mydog1, mydog2, mydog99 etc), as any human being that has hacked one site containing your email address and a password may well try the same combination (or similar ones) on other sites – see this blog on re-using passwords.

Add all these things together and I’m now teetering on the edge of closing my LinkedIn account. Certainly, I changed my own LinkedIn password as soon as possible after the above incident. I would advise you to do the same.

© 2011-2018 David Leonard
Computer Support in London
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