Java is a security risk and is now of very little use

What is Java?

Java logo #1Java is a programming language that is often installed (free of charge) onto computers. It works via an “add-in” to the web browser. A browser is the program you use to view and interact with websites (eg Internet Explorer, Chrome, Firefox, Opera or Safari). Java is used to run special bits of code on websites (such as animations) that could not be programmed in the main browser programming language (known as “html” – hypertext markup language). Note that “Java” has nothing at all to do with another programming language called “Javascript”. You have no need to worry about Javascript. Also, note that the security problems with Java are not actually inherent in Java but are caused by the “browser plug-in” that allows Java to talk to the web page.

The Java browser plug-in has often been exploited to install malware onto computers. That goes a long way to explain the regular notifications in the bottom of your screen that a new version of Java is available. The new version will be amendments to stop recently-discovered exploits from working.

Why Remove it Now?

As it has become more apparent that Java has big security issues, more and more web designers have moved away from using it to deliver their “fancy” content to your browser. Adobe Flash is now a much preferred languaging program. I have recently seen figures that suggest that Java is now installed on less than 0.2% of all websites.

What will happen if I remove it?

Java logo #2Probably nothing at all. The worst thing that is likely to happen is that a part of a web page that is trying to deliver you some fancy content won’t be able to. You may well see a white box where the content would be displayed if you had Java installed (see the illustration below). There may also be a reference to a “missing plug-in” or something similar.

How do I remove it?

In Windows, go to the Control Panel and choose the “Programs and Features” option. This option was called “Add or Remove Programs” on versions of Windows before Vista. Highlight the Java entry (or, indeed, “entries”. Java has been infamous for installing loads of new versions without cleaning up after itself by removing the redundant versions). After highlighting the entry, click on the “uninstall” option and follow the on-screen instructions.

On a Mac, open Finder, open the “Applications” folder, right-click on JavaAppletPlugin.plugin and left-click on the “Move to Trash” option.

Also, disable any Java plug-ins in your browser.


How do I check to see if Java is (still) installed?

Go to www.java.com and click on the link that says “Do I have Java?” Then click on the “Agree and Continue” button. If Java has gone then you will see a more-or-less blank box (as in the illustration below).

Java Not Present Screen

The grey box with “this plug-in is not supported” indicates that Java is not installed. You would probably see a similar box on any other site that tried to display Java content when Java was not installed.

What if I need it back?

There’s just a very tiny chance that something on a website that is important to you will cease to function if you remove Java. In that case, I would suggest installing a browser that you don’t normally use (“Opera” is a good one) and install Java on that browser. Then, only use that browser for the site that includes the Java programming. Be very careful that you only install Java from www.java.com. There are fake “Java updaters” out there that will install malware onto your computer if you give them half a chance.

Why Now?

Nothing spectacular has just happened, or is about to happen. Things have just moved on and now is as good a time as any to take action. It’s probably worth removing rather than just ignoring it as the popup boxes advising upgrading it are a nuisance and every time you upgrade it there is a chance of falling for the disgraceful trick built into the upgrade process that causes you to install the awful “Ask Toolbar”. See this link for more on this practice.

If you’d rather not remove it yourself and are a computer support client of mine then I could remove it on my next visit. Alternatively, I’d be happy to remove it for you via a Teamviewer remote control session.

© 2011-2018 David Leonard
Computer Support in London
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