What is the difference between “saving” and “running” files downloaded from the internet?

Download Button - 1Actually, probably not much in most circumstances. When you “run” a file from a website, it is downloaded to your own computer and placed in a temporary folder. You probably can’t easily see where that temporary folder is and you probably won’t care as the assumption is that you will “run” the file just once and then won’t need it again. The file that has been placed in the temporary folder will probably be deleted some time in the future (especially if you run a Windows disc cleanup utility or a third party utility such as CCleaner). So, when you take the option to “run” the file, it is downloaded to a temporary location and then run from there.

If you choose to “save” the file then it is saved onto your hard drive in the location that is stipulated in your browser for the storing of downloaded files. You may then need to navigate to that location to double-click on the file in order to run it. This can be made easier by your browser offering a button which opens up a list of recently downloaded files and/or the contents of the download location.

So, a downloaded file is placed in a “normal” folder on your hard drive. It is not going to be deleted by running utilities that clean up temporary files.

Download Button - 4In lots of cases it really doesn’t matter whether you chose to “run” or “save”. If you “save” then you do have the extra steps of opening the file location and double-clicking on the file. This disadvantage is weighed against the advantage of knowing where the file is and knowing you can easily open it again, copy it, move it, etc.

Whether you tend to “run” or “save” downloaded items, it is a good idea to know where downloaded files are saved. The default folder for Downloads depends on the operating system rather than the browser. This means that if you don’t change the Download folder then all browsers will save downloaded files into the following folders:

  • Windows XP – \Documents and Settings\username\My Documents\Downloads
  • Windows Vista/ Windows 7/ Windows 8 – \Users\username\Downloads
  • Mac – /Users/username/Downloads

.. where “username” is the name of the logged-on user.

You can change the default location if you wish (for instance, your hard drive may be partitioned into drives c: and d: and you may wish your downloads to be placed in drive d: rather than c:).

Changing the place where your downloads are stored is achieved as follows in the different browsers:

Firefox

  • Click on the “open menu” button (top right)
  • Click on “Options”
  • Click on the “General” tab
  • Change the Downloads location as shown
  • Close open dialog boxes

Internet Explorer 11

  • Click on the “Settings” button (top right)
  • Left-click on “View Downloads”
  • Left-click on “Options” in the bottom lefthand corner of the window
  • Change the Downloads location as desired
  • Close open dialog boxes

Google Chrome

  • Click on the Menu button (top right)
  • Left-click on “Settings” option
  • Scroll down and click on “Show advanced settings”
  • Scroll down to “Downloads” section and change as necessary
  • Close “Settings” window

Safari

  • Click on the “Safari” command at the top left of the screen
  • Left-click on “Preferences”
  • Click on the “General” tab
  • Change the “Save downloaded files to:” option as desired
  • Close Preferences window

PS: I don’t know why Google’s Feedburner service delivered the blog emails one day late last week. My aim is to publish the post by 12:30 on a Saturday and Google seem to deliver it by about 3pm on the same day. They do pretty well, though, considering that (a) this is only the second or third time they’ve been late in four years and (b) the service is free!

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© 2011-2018 David Leonard
Computer Support in London
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