In these days of ransomware, isn’t it dangerous to leave backup drives connected all the time?

Backup Drive on a LaptopVery slowly, data backups are becoming easier to keep up to date. If you buy a Seagate external drive, for instance, it will probably include backup software that you can “set and forget”. Once you’ve made your initial decsions about what you want to back up, how many copies to keep and so on, the software just keeps doing it as long as the backup drive is connected to your computer (usually by USB cable). Yes, it can be a bit inconvenient having an external drive permanently hanging off the side of your machine – especially if it is a laptop that spends a lot of time on a desktop but some time on your lap. It’s just not good practice to forget the drive is attached and yank it around by the cable when moving the laptop! If it goes crashing to the floor then it could easily be “goodnight Vienna” and back to PC World for another one.

That aside, I think a lot of people have actually started to get used to the idea of having backups automatically taken and updated. This is especially true, of course, for Mac owners who just have to set the inbuilt “Time Machine” software to use an external drive and then forget all about it.

And then along comes ransomware. This is malware that encrypts data on your computer and demands a ransom to decrypt it for you. See this previous blog post on CryptoLocker, for instance. There is obviously a very strong argument that says you should never ever give in to blackmail, but if the only alternative is to lose invaluable data then it’s not difficult to see why people pay up. Now, the problem with ransomware is that it can encrypt data that’s on your external drive as well as your internal drive if the external drive is connected at the time that the malware attacks.

On the face of it, then, you are between a rock and a hard place. If you don’t keep your external drive connected you risk losing data that’s not backed up, and if you do keep it connected then the data is backed up but is vulnerable to being snatched away from you by ransomware.

Time Machine Settings

As you can see, I back up my MacBook Pro to a 750gb drive and also to a 1 terabyte drive. This dialog box shows me when I used the drives, so I know which one to use next.

If you’ve got a Mac then it’s actually quite easy to resolve this dilemma. Not only is the inbuilt Time Machine software easy to “set and forget” but it’s also flexible enough to let you use more than one backup drive. So, you simply alternate the drives as often as you wish. If one should fail or be compromised then the other – although probably not completely up to date – will take almost all of the pain out of the situation. This is actually a very good and simple practice. An external drive only costs £40-£60 these days. Just buy another one and alternate them. It’s a no-brainer. For the sake of completeness, I’m just going to mention one more practice that you can adopt if you really want to be responsible about your data backups. And that is to take a second backup onto an external drive and then remove it from the premises. Ask a friend or relative to keep it for you and periodically swap it for a later backup. This may sound like overkill, but it does provide a layer of protection against something disastrous happening not just to your computer, but to the entire location – eg fire, theft, or flood.

To be honest, I don’t know if swapping drives would work when taking continuous, incremental, backups using software such as Acronis or Seagate’s on a Windows PC. It’s just possible that files are marked to say that they’ve been backed up, so wouldn’t get backed up if a different backup drive were substituted. This is almost certainly one of those IT situations where the quickest way to find out is probably to “suck it and see”. In the meantime, you can ensure that a second backup will definitely work by doing a full backup instead of an ongoing incremental one.

Backup Strategy JokeWhether it’s worth bothering about the possibility of falling victim to ransomware is, of course, your own decision. And I should add that, as far as I know, Cryptolocker still only attacks Windows PCs. It’s very difficult to assess the chances of such disasters happening. I recommend that you imagine the situation you’d find yourself in if such a disaster did happen. Go on – really think about what you might lose and how inconvenient it would be. That should then give you some idea of how much effort you are prepared to put into creating and following contingency plans.

© 2011-2018 David Leonard
Computer Support in London
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