Search Results : browser

Want to move to a different browser?

Favorites folderYou may have thought of trying a different browser, but can’t face the thought of starting afresh with your collection of internet favorites (known as bookmarks in some browsers). Well, don’t let that stop you. It’s fairly easy to copy your favorites from one browser to another (technically, we are “importing” rather than “copying”, but that’s splitting hairs).

So, just look down to find the section relating to the browser you wish to start using, and follow the instructions. As usual with my blog posts of this kind, the instructions relate to the latest versions of the browsers.

Chrome

  • Click on the three vertical dots at the top righthand corner of the browser
  • Click on “bookmarks”
  • Click on “import bookmarks and settings”
  • If Firefox isn’t the browser from which you are copying bookmarks, click on the triangle next to it and choose either Edge or Internet Explorer instead. The last option in the list (“Bookmarks HTML file”) is for when you are transferring Chrome bookmarks between computers
  • Uncheck any items that you con’t wish to copy from your previous browser
  • Click on “Import”
  • If you have your previous browser open, then close it now and then click “Continue”

After the importing has been completed, you can see where Chrome has put your bookmarks and move move them around using the Bookmarks Manager:

  • Click on the three vertical dots at the top righthand corner of the browser
  • Click on “bookmarks”
  • Click on “bookmark manager”

BookmarkFirefox

  • Click on the icon of the clipboard (it has the tooltip “show your bookmarks”) that is next to the star that bookmarks the current page
  • Click on “show all bookmarks”
  • Click on “Import and Backup” at the top of the screen
  • Click on “Import Data from Another Browser”
  • Select the browser and click “Next”
  • De-select any items you do not wish to import
  • Click “Next”
  • Click “Finish” when you see the message “The following items were successfully imported: Favorites”

Firefox leaves you in the Bookmark Manager, so you can see the imported items (in a folder called, for instance, “From Intenet Explorer”) and move them around as desired.

Internet Explorer

  • Click on the “File” command
  • Click on “Import and Export”
  • Ensure that “Import from another browser” is selected
  • Click on “Next”
  • Select Safari or Chrome (note that Microsoft don’t give you the option to import from “Edge” (their other browser))
  • Click on “Import”
  • Click on “Finish”

To organise your favorites in Internet Explorer:

  • Click on the icon of the star (top right of browser)
  • Click on the triangle next to “Add to favorites”
  • Click on “organize favorites”

StarEdge

  • Click on the three horizontal dots (top right of browser)
  • Click on “Settings”
  • Click on “View favorites settings”
  • Select the browser from which to import the favorites (note that Microsoft are happy to give us the option to import from Internet Explorer to Edge, but not vice versa)
  • Click on “Import”

To organise your favorites in Edge:

  • Click on the icon with three unequal-length horizontal bars (apparently, this is called “the hub”)
  • In the popup, click on the favorites icon (the star)
  • You can now drag and drop favorites to move them around, or right-click to rename or delete

Safari (on a Mac)

  • Click on the “File” command
  • Click on “Import from” and then select the browser whose favorites/bookmarks you wish to copy
  • Untick “history” if you do not want to import it
  • Click on “import”

When I tried this, I found my “bookmarks” imported from Chrome were placed inside a bookmarks folder called “favorites” (accessible by clicking on the “bookmarks” command). No, I couldn’t figure that one out.

Globe and Keys

Do you get hassled by your browser offering to save passwords?

All major browsers can be configured to save the username and password of your account at the website you have just accessed. That’s all very well if:

  • You don’t use a password manager (such as LastPass) to handle this for you and
  • You trust the browser to keep the information safe

If either of these conditions is untrue then you may prefer your browser to stop being so eager to help. Detailed below are the instructions for configuring the current versions of the major browsers.

One browser will quite happily display all your passwords without asking for any credentials at all. So, anyone accessing your computer can easily see these passwords. And which one is it? Firefox – see below

Firefox logoFirefox

  • Click on Menu option (three horizontal bars at top right)
  • Click on “Options”
  • Click on “Security”
  • Untick “Remember login for sites”
  • Close the “options” tab (or the entire browser)

Note that, before closing Options, you can click on “Saved Logins” and then “Show Passwords” to display all the passwords you’ve asked Firefox to save for you. I can’t imagine why they make this so insecure.

Chrome logoChrome

  • Click on Menu option (three dots at top right)
  • Click on “Settings”
  • Scroll down to “Advanced” and click on it
  • Scroll down further and, under the “passwords and forms” section, click the arrow to the right of “manage passwords” and slide the blue switch left to the “off” position
  • Close the “Settings” tab (or the entire browser)

Note that, a bit further down, there is a section called “Saved Passwords”. If you click the 3 dots to the right of a saved password then you can click on details. In the popup window, you can then click on the “eye” symbol to see the password. It will then ask you for your Windows password. This is the password you use to log on as a Windows user. It won’t accept a pin (even if that’s your normal logon method). I haven’t tested what happens if you sign on to your computer as a local user with no password.

Safari logoSafari (on a Mac)

  • Click on the “Safari” menu option
  • Click on “Preferences”
  • Click on the “passwords” tab
  • Untick “Autofill user names and passwords”
  • Close the passwords window

IE11 - iconInternet Explorer

  • Click on the Settings “cog wheel”
  • Click on “Internet Options”
  • Click on the “Content” tab
  • Click on “Settings” in the AutoComplete section
  • Untick “User names and passwords on forms”
  • Click on “OK” on each of the two open boxes

Note that there is an option “Manage Passwords”. Clicking on this (in Wondows 10, anyway) will open Windows “Web Credentials”. You will need to supply your Windows user password to access the stored passwords.

Edge logoEdge

  • Click on menu (3 horizontal dots)
  • Click on “Settings”
  • Scroll down and click on “View advanced settings”
  • Scroll down and slide the switch leftwards that is next to “offer to save passwords”
  • Click somewhere to the left of the “Settings” menu to close it

Padlock with key

Following on from last week’s blog, how do you go about saving usernames and passwords for websites, and how do you go about seeing what has been saved in your browser?

All of the following instructions are for the latest version of the browser (as at 29/10/2015) when viewed on a Windows 10 PC. The exception is, of course, the Safari instructions. All instructions are for desktop/laptop machines.

Firefox-logoFirefox v41.0.2

  • Click on the Menu button at the top right of the Firefox window (three horizontal lines representing, I suppose, a menu)
  • Click on the cog wheel (with “Options” written underneath)
  • Click on the padlock (representing Security) on the left sidebar
  • From here, you can tick or untick the box next to “Remember passwords for sites” and you can see the passwords you have saved by clicking on “Saved Passwords” and then clicking on “Show Passwords”

Note that, in Firefox, you can set a master password that grants/denies access to the saved passwords, but if you do set one Firefox asks you to enter it every time you open the browser – a bit of a pain.

Chrome-LogoChrome v46.0.2490.71

  • Click on the Menu button at the top right of the Chrome window (three horizontal lines representing, I suppose, a menu)
  • Click on the “Settings” option
  • Scroll down to “advanced settings” and click on it
  • Scroll down to the section entitled “Passwords and forms”
  • Click in the box next to “Offer to save your web passwords”
  • To see your passwords, click on “Manage passwords”. Initially the passwords are represented by bullet points. Click on a password entry and then click the “show” button to see the password. You then need to enter the Windows password for the user that is logged in. This is the password for the Microsoft account of the logged-in user. I have no idea how Google Chrome is able to read your Microsoft password and I don’t know what happens if you are on a version of Windows that didn’t require a password for the user. Certainly, Windows 10 would not let me create another Windows user without supplying both an email address for that person and a password with which to log on.

IE9 - Internet Explorer 9 - logoInternet Explorer v11.0

  • To save passwords, just click on “Yes” when Internet Explorer offers to store a password that you have just typed in
  • To view saved passwords, carry out the following instructions:
    • Go to the windows Control Panel
    • Click to open the Credential Manager
    • Click on “Web Credentials”
    • Click on the entry that is of interest and then click on “show”
    • You will then need to enter the password of the currently logged-on Windows user.

Note: the above instructions for all three browsers are for Windows 10. I haven’t had time to check on previous versions of Windows.

Safari-logoSafari (on a Mac) v9.0.1

  • Click on the “Safari” menu option
  • Click on “Preferences”
  • Click on the “Passwords” tab
  • To see a password, click the box next to “show passwords for selected websites” and select the required site by clicking on its entry. You will need to enter the administrator’s password for the logged-in user.

I’m often asked by my computer support clients whether it is a good idea to let browsers save the logon credentials for websites

Knocking on Google login panelFrom the point of view of security, there are two types of threat to consider:

  • Anyone who has access to your computer might be able to use and/or steal your passwords. Only you can assess whether household members (or office colleagues, for that matter) pose a threat to your privacy and security.
  • The browser software could be hacked to reveal your passwords. I don’t, personally, know of anyone who has had this happen to them, but I have read several times on the internet that there is malware out there that can do it.

So, I can’t actually answer the question for you. I think it comes down to something we do all the time without even thinking about it – balance risk against convenience. If we wish to cross the road and we are on a quiet country lane then we are unlikely to walk 100 yards to the nearest pedestrian crossing. We might be prepared to walk much further than that for a safe crossing if it’s the Euston Road we are trying to negotiate.

I’d like to suggest a few questions that you might ask yourself to give you an idea of whether it is a good idea for you to save passwords in your browser:

  • Do you think that online banking is too risky? If so, I think your caution will probably extend to never letting browsers store passwords. Personally, I trust online banking and would hate to do without it but if I was cautious enough not to trust online banking then I certainly wouldn’t trust my browser to keep my secrets safe.
  • Would the consequences of someone finding a particular username and password combination be catastrophic? If so, it probably wouldn’t be wise to commit that specific password to your browser.
  • Do you tend (despite advice to the contrary) to use and re-use the same password(s) over and over again? If so, you must bear in mind the risk that discovery of one of your passwords could give someone access to other accounts. Committing even one username/password combination to your browser could expose many other accounts to being hacked.
  • Do you have children in the household? In my experience, households with children suffer far more from malware attacks than households without. I’m not blaming the children. I think it’s probably because the nasty scrotes that write malware know that children have less mature judgement than adults, less fear, a greater propensity to be led by others into visitng specific (dangerous) websites, a greater propensity to share online content (including malware) with each other, and so on. If your risk of catching ANY malware is increased, then it probably follows that the risk of catching malware that can find your passwords is increased.
  • Do you think that usernames and passwords give you a huge amount of grief in your online life? I know some people who seem to be able to remember an enormous number of combinations of usernames and passwords, whereas others can’t even remember their own phone number. If passwords give you a huge amount of grief then it might well be worth reducing the burden somewhat by getting your browser to remember some of the less important username/password combinations.

Hooded Computer UserQuite often, when I have (annoyingly) answered the original question with “it depends….”, the client will then ask “what do YOU do about saving passwords online?”. The answer is that I use some software called LastPass to remember most of my online passwords, but I also record all my usernames/passwords somewhere else as well. I don’t use LastPass to remember the most important financial combinations. If you asked me to rationalise why I do what I do, I can’t. What I can say is that I think I balance risk against convenience in a way that seems to suit me. And when I see my clients struggling to find specific passwords, I often think that they would probably be better off by committing at least some of them to their browser for safe-keeping.

Has something hijacked your home page?

It is quite common for both malicious and benign software to decide (rather arrogantly) that it’s going to replace your browser home page with something else and that it’s not going to ask your permission or even tell you about it. This blog explains how to put it back again.

To begin with, what is your browser home page? It is nothing more than a specific page on a specific website that your browser opens when you first start the browser running or when you click on the browser home button (usually an icon of a house). Also, it may or may not be the same page as is opened when you open a new tab in a browser window (so that you have more than one web page open at once in the same browser window).

There’s room for a bit of confusion here as the term “home page” is also used to mean the “main page” or “beginning page” of any website. As such, a website’s home page is usually (but by no means always) the first page of that website that a visitor will land on. So, it’s quite likely that your browser’s home page (the first page it opens) is also the home page of the website it opens.

All browsers (Firefox, Chrome, Internet Explorer, Safari etc) give you the option of deciding for yourself what your home page should be. In practice, I would guess that about two thirds of all the home pages I see on my computer support clients’ browsers are set to the Google Search page (https://www.google.co.uk). A fair proportion of the rest are set to the BBC home page at www.bbc.co.uk. Personally, I wouldn’t recommend the latter as the BBC’s web pages are technically complicated, with loads of images and links to flashplayer etc, so the page may load quite slowly. Fine if that’s where you want to go, but a bit inefficient if the only reason for using that page as your home page is that you’ve got to start somewhere.

If you wish to change your browser’s home page, it’s a good idea to open the browser and navigate to the page you want to make your home page before following the instructions below. This is because you often get the opportunity to choose your “current page” or “current pages” (the web page(s) you are currently looking at) as your home page(s). That way, you can see you’ve got it right before choosing the page(s). Be careful, though: if you currently have six tabs open then all of the six open pages will become home pages, opened whenever you start your browser!


Firefox – see Figures 1a and 1b

  • Click on the menu button
  • Click on “Options”
  • Click on “General” on the sidebar list
  • Enter the webpage address or select “current”
  • Close the current tab (called “Options”) or close the browser and re-open it

Firefox Options 1

Figure 1a) Firefox Options


Firefox Options 2

Figure 1b) Firefox Options


Chrome – see Figures 2a and 2b

  • Click on the menu button
  • Click on the “settings” option
  • Under the “On Startup” heading, select “Open a specific page or set of pages”
  • Click on “Select Pages” and either select “current pages” or type in the website address (also known as the URL)
  • Close the current tab (called “Settings”) or close the browser and re-open it

Chrome Settings 1

Figure 2a) Chrome Settings

Chrome Settings 2

Figure 2b) Chrome Settings


Internet Explorer – see Figures 3a and 3b

  • Click on the “Tools” icon of a cogwheel
  • Click on “Internet Options”
  • Click on the “General” tab
  • Enter the web address(es) or click on “Use current”
  • Click on the “OK” button

Internet Explorer Tools 2

Figure 3a) Internet Explorer Settings

Internet Explorer Tools 2

Figure 3b) Internet Explorer Settings


Safari (on a Mac) – see Figures 4a and 4b

  • Click on the “Safari” menu option at the top of the screen
  • Click on “Preferences”
  • Click on the “General” tab
  • Enter the web address(es) or click on “Set to Current Page”
  • Close the “Preferences” page

Safari Settings 1

Figure 4a) Safari Settings

Safari Settings 2

Figure 4b) Safari Settings


If you are unable to change your Home Page, or if it insists on going back to a page that you have not chosen, then I’m afraid it is likely that you have malware on your computer and more drastic measures are indicated.

Have you ever wanted to see two different web pages at the same time side by side?

Two Firefox browser windows side by side

Two Firefox browser windows side by side

As computer screens have become wider (relative to their height), it has become easier and more useful to see two different windows side by side. This should extend to being able to see two browser windows side by side, probably showing different web pages. You would probably imagine that that is quite easy to achieve (if only you could find the right menu option!)

Well, I can’t find out how to do it in a single step in any of the major browsers (Internet Explorer 11, Chrome or Firefox), but I can manage to do it in two steps and I think it’s worth getting to grips with.

The first step is easy. Open your chosen browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Chrome). This, of course, opens the first window. Then, in any of these three major browsers, hitting Ctrl n (ie depressing the Ctrl key and, while it is down, tapping the letter “n”) will open a new window in that same browser.

The problem is, though, that the new window will be sitting right on top of the first window if the window is maximised (ie, if it is taking up the whole screen) and will be slightly offset from the previous window if the first window was not maximised. However you had the original window, opening a new one won’t put them neatly side by side.

So we now have the job of re-arranging the windows:

If you are using Windows Vista (or even XP) then you are on your own, here. It’s a case of manually dragging windows around and re-sizing them by dragging their edges to the desired positions. If, however, you are using Windows 7 or Windows 8, then you can use the shortcuts that re-size the current window to half the screen size and move the same window to one edge of the screen at the same time.

Windows Key

One version of a “Windows” key

Depress the Windows key and, while it is down, hit the “right” or “cursor right” key (usually marked with “>” or a rightward pointing arrow). The current window will re-size itself so that it takes up the righthand half of the screen. With the Windows key still down, more presses of the “cursor right” key will shift the window to the lefthand half of the screen and then to the original size and position. In other words, repeated presses of the cursor right key cause the window size and position to cycle repeatedly through the three possibilities. In fact, starting with the Windows key and “cursor left” does exactly the same but starts in the left half of the screen – ie it cycles in the opposite direction.

So, clicking the Windows key and right cursor key on the top window will move that window to one side and reveal the window underneath (the first browser window you opened). Just click on this original window to make it the “current” one and then repeat the “windows key and cursor right” action until the window occupies the left half of the screen. You will now have re-sized and re-positioned two independent browser windows side by side.

This all sounds a bit painful and difficult, but it’s much easier to do it than to describe it (once you’ve done it a few times). Also, it is a technique that can be used for positioning many types of windows (not just browser windows) side by side.

Mac Command Key

The Mac Command key

On a Mac, it’s easy enough to open multiple Safari browser windows. Just right-click on the Safari icon in the dock and left click on “New Window”. Alternatively, click on the “file” command on the Safari top menu and click on “New Window”. Even easier, when in Safari, just depress the Command key and tap the”n” key. The “Command” key is the one with the funny symbol as illustrated. As far as I know, there isn’t an easy way to divide a Mac screen into equally-sized windows.

Have you ever wanted to compare the contents of two browser tabs side by side?

A quite common situation occurred to me a few days ago when a client asked me to compare two computers that she had shortlisted for possible purchase.

Firefox-logoShe sent me the links to the web pages that she had been looking at and I duly loaded them into my browser (I still use Firefox as the privacy add-ons are better than on other browsers). This meant that I had two different tabs open and, as you might expect, I found myself clicking between them, comparing feature with feature on the two products. This soon started to fry my brain and I decided that it would be better if I could see them both at the same time, side-by-side. I couldn’t immediately think how to do that and thought instead about opening another instance of Firefox (which you can do by right-clicking the taskbar icon – on Windows 7 and 8, anyway – and taking the appropriate option).

IE9 - Internet Explorer 9 - logoThen it dawned on me that this was one of those occasions where our habits tend to lead us to do something that is sub-optimal because we can’t be bothered to spend a bit of time learning a better way. I’m pretty sure that we all do that quite often. Sometimes I’m looking over a client’s shoulder and catch them doing something a long way round. I’m very happy to show them a quicker way if I know one. In these situations, I am always reminded of the way I used to drive around London (before giving up driving altogether over 20 years ago). I would drive from known point to known point until I got near where I was going and only then would I think about how to home in on the destination. It meant, of course, that I was zig-zagging around town like a demented yachtsman, instead of learning the proper way (“No wonder you gave up driving”, I hear you say).

Anyway, I decided on this occasion that it’s time I sorted this one out and shared it with you.

Dragging a browser tab to a new window

Left-clicking on the tab in the red ellipse and then dragging in the direction of the black arrow caused the tiny window in the green ellipse to appear. Letting go of the mouse then turned this into a full-blown window. The image is of Firefox, but all the major browsers behave in a similar manner.

After a bit of playing around with different browsers, I discovered that, although their shortcut keys and menus are still different, ALL of the major browsers except Opera allow you to move any tab into its own window just by left-clicking on the tab itself and dragging the tab away from its normal position. Then let go of the mouse button and a new window immediately opens up on the correct web page.

It’s possible that this doesn’t work on older versions of browsers. I’m not going to molly-coddle users of such browsers by investigating and providing alternatives because I’m not going to encourage the use of old versions of browsers. It’s a good idea to keep your browser updated. Holes in browsers are a major entry point for the baddies out there to get at your computer, so it’s a good idea to keep up with the latest browser.

Putting my head on the block, I think the versions I tried this method on are the latest:

  • Firefox – 23.0.1
  • Chrome – 29.0.1547.57
  • Internet Explorer – 10
  • Safari – 5.1.7 on PC and 6.0.5 on Mac

I couldn’t find a way of moving a tab to a new window in Opera. Instead, you can arrange tabbed windows side-by-side by right-clicking on a tab and then choosing “Arrange” and “Tile vertically” or “Tile horizontally”

Chrome-LogoIf you are still using Windows XP, then the latest version of Internet Explorer you can install is version 8. This version does not allow you to drag tabs away from their bar. In that case, you may think you’ve just wasted five minutes of your life, but I’m going to take the opportunity to remind you that Microsoft will cease support for Windows XP (and Office 2003) in April 2014 and it may become very unsafe to use your computer online thereafter. Start thinking about replacing it. See this previous blog about Microsoft ceasing support for Windows XP and Office 2003.

Having split your tabs into two separate browser windows, you can then easily show two windows side by side by allocating half the screen to each window – if, that is, you are using a PC with Windows 7 or 8. I detailed the process for this here.

So, there you go, a shortcut that’s easy, almost universal, and intuitive (once you’ve used it once or twice).

What are the main internet browsers and are two – or more – better than one?

Internet Explorer

IE9 - Internet Explorer 9 - logoSupplied by Microsoft as part of Windows, this used to be the leading browser. The European Commission judged that Microsoft was taking unfair advantage by supplying their own browser with their (almost ubiquitous) operating system. A deal was struck in 2009 whereby new Windows machines pop up a screen pointing out that Internet Explorer is not the only browser. It then offers links to download other browsers. For more information, see this link to the Microsoft Competition Case.

Firefox

Firefox-logoFirefox is produced by Mozilla, a non-profit organisation. The main advantage of Firefox is that there is a huge range of “add-ons” that you can install to the browser. Other browsers also allow add-ons, but Firefox’s range is probably the biggest. Firefox gained a lot of fans a few years ago at a time when it was thought that Internet Explorer was insecure.

Chrome

Chrome-LogoChrome is produced by Google. It’s a fairly new browser (released in 2008), but is now probably the most popular (see the end of this article). In Google’s own words – “Chrome is a fast, simple and secure web browser, built for the modern web.”

 

Safari

Safari-logoSafari is Apple’s browser, installed as part of both its desktop/laptop systems (Mac) and its mobile systems (iPhone and iPad). Don’t ask me why Apple are allowed to bundle their own browser in their operating system but Microsoft have to offer alternatives. The only reason I can think of is that Apple is such a tiny minnow in comparison with Microsoft (as far as browser use is concerned) that no-one thinks it worth pursuing Apple for unfair practices. There is a version of Safari for Windows PCs but it doesn’t seem to be very popular.

Opera

Opera-logoThe other “main player” in browsers is Opera. This is a Norwegian product that is possibly not as well known as the others mentioned here, but seems to me to be stable and highly useable.

 


 

Can you have more than one browser installed?

Yes. Browsers are just like other programs in that they shouldn’t interfere with each other. In the same way that you could have two or more media players (such as iTunes and Windows Media Player) installed at the same time, you can also have several browsers. In fact, the only major area of software in which you must not have competing products is security software such as antivirus programs and firewalls. You can even have different browsers open at the same time.

Why have more than one browser installed?

There are several reasons why you might wish to have more than one browser installed on one system:

  • As a troubleshooting tool. Sometimes you might find that a website does not display properly or does not behave properly. This could happen if an “add-on” that you have installed on the browser isn’t “playing nicely” with some aspect of the website you are visiting or with other aspects of the browser it’s working with. It could also happen as a result of the browser itself interpreting the website’s programming in a manner not envisaged by the programmer. So, if a website is driving you mad because its behaviour isn’t what you expect, I would advise launching the same web page in a different browser to see if there is any difference. In my own system, for instance, there is some problem stopping me from accessing my online banking details when I use Firefox. There’s no such problem when using Opera.
  • To stay logged into Google without them knowing everything you do on the internet. If you use Google services that require you to be logged into your Google account (such as Gmail or AdWords), it’s very easy – and convenient – to stay logged in while you use the browser for other purposes. That’s exactly what Google want you to do as they can then track your movements as you browse the internet. If, like me, you don’t want Google to do this, but often forget to log out of your Google acount, then a simple solution is to use one browser exclusively for websites where you have to be logged in to Google. Just minimise the browser when it’s not in use and use a different browser for other online purposes. I’m sure the same principle applies for other online services that require you to be logged in but then use this to track your online activities.
  • To use services that require a specific browser. There are some things you can not do on Microsoft sites, for instance, unless you are using Internet Explorer. Downloading Microsoft program updates is an example. If you are using a Windows computer and prefer a browser other than Internet Explorer, I would not recommend un-installing Internet Explorer: just leave it there but don’t use it unless you need to for specific purposes.
  • Personal preference – different people using the same computer may prefer different browsers.

It might be logical for me to offer an opinion as to the merits and drawbacks of different browsers but, to be honest, I really don’t think there’s a lot to choose between them if you are an average user (and I think that covers all my own computer support clients). I use Internet Explorer, Firefox and Opera on my PCs, Safari and Firefox on my Mac, Safari on my iPhone, and Firefox on my Android tablet.

Just out of interest, though, here’s a graph showing how the popularity of the different browsers has changed over time. This shows that Internet Explorer’s supremacy may at last be over as Chrome is now slightly ahead in terms of market share (the exact figures on this graph are Chrome – 28.4% of the market, Internet Explorer – 27.6%, Firefox – 22.8%, Safari – 14.1%, and Opera – 2.3%, miscellaneous – 4.8%). Source – w3counter

Browser Market Share 2012

You may also be interested in this previous blog post on the subject of web browsers

Do you find it frustrating that browser layouts keep changing? Do you struggle to find your favorites, for instance?

Over the last year or two there has been a tendency for browsers to become less “cluttered”. The designers have deliberately removed a lot of the buttons and options from the screen. This is meant to make the browsers easier to use. There’s no doubt that this leaves more room for the actual web page that you are looking at. On the downside, though, is that it is sometimes annoyingly difficult to do things that should be easy – finding your favorites/bookmarks, browsing history, and so on.

Not only is this problem made worse by regular updates to the browser, but if you use more than one browser life gets even more complicated.

Hands on piano keyboard

Some keyboard shortcuts need the skill of a concert pianist

So, I thought I’d have a look at the keyboard shortcuts that are built into the browsers and see if it might be easier in the long run to learn a few of them. My general advice with keyboard shortcuts is to learn some of the most common (that can be applied to lots of situations), such as Ctrl c, Ctrl v, Ctrl x, etc, but not to bother with the more arcane ones unless you really are likely to get into the habit of using them regularly. For some of them, you don’t just need the memory of an elephant, but also the dexterity of a concert pianist. I can’t imagine ever wanting to memorise that “Ctrl Alt Shift 4″, for instance, could perform any useful function.

Having looked at all the popular browsers (except Safari), I was pleased to find that a lot of shortcuts are common right across the board. Working on the theory that the more of these I present the less notice you will take of them, here is a short(ish) list of the most useful keyboard shortcuts that are common across all the major browsers – Internet Explorer 8 and 9, Firefox, Opera, and Chrome:-

[table file=”http://www.davidleonard.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Common-Browser-Shortcut-Keys.csv”][/table]

There are some important functions that don’t have common shortcuts. I’ve just looked into those that I find the most useful:-

[table file=”http://www.davidleonard.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Specific-Browser-Shortcuts.csv”][/table]

Notes:

a) I couldn’t find a shortcut key. Click on the spanner at the top righthand corner.
b) I couldn’t find a shortcut key. Click on the “Opera” logo at the top lefthand corner.
c) To use the shortcuts that include one or more “modifiers” (the Ctrl, Alt and Shift keys, for instance), first depress the modifier(s) and then, while that is still pressed, click on the other key. Then let go of them all.

As I’ve said, these are just a few of the most common functions. If you’re even sadder than I am, and want to spend a weekend studying browser keyboard shortcuts, then links to more comprehensive lists for the browsers are as follows:

Internet Explorer 8 shortcut keys
Internet Explorer 9 shortcut keys
Firefox shortcut keys
Chrome shortcut keys
Opera shortcut keys
Safari shortcut keys (for Mac users)

A web browser is a program on your own computer that connects to other computers on the worldwide web, sends and receives data, and deals with that data for you (such as presenting it on screen, saving it, printing it).

There are several different browsers, made by different companies, that do the same job. The most prominent (with links where still available) are:

Internet Explorer logoInternet Explorer version 9 (not for XP)
Internet Explorer version 8 (for XP)

 

Firefox logoMozilla Firefox

 

Chrome logoGoogle Chrome

 

Safari logoSafari

 

There is also the AOL browser that is only used by AOL subscribers. AOL subscribers can also use any of the other browsers.

So what’s the difference between them? Not a great deal. Pushed to name the best feature of each, I would suggest:

Internet Explorer – automatic security updates via Microsoft update (that also keeps your Windows updated)
Mozilla Firefox – huge range of add-ons (plugins)
Chrome – fast
Safari – built by Apple, so has the look and feel of a Mac
AOL – er…

Unlike security software (antivirus, other antimalware, and firewalls) you can have as many browsers on your computers as you wish. They do not conflict with each other.

Plugins

Browsers originally dealt with text and images but they can now also handle a variety of types of multimedia (eg video). A lot of this functionality is provided by the addition of specialised programs called “plugins” and “add-ons”.

For instance, you are probably familiar with Adobe Flash Player. This is an extra program, installed separately from your browser, that gives you the ability to watch videos etc directly from your browser. If we didn’t have what Flash Player does then we would probably need to download our video to our computer and then open up a different program to view it. Flash Player allows us to view it within our browser window and also allows us to “stream” the content. “Streaming” means that we are watching the video as it is delivered to our browser, rather than having to save it all first before starting to watch it.

There are many, many other plugins that we can add directly into our browser. I use one on Firefox called Adblock Plus. This does a very good job of removing ads from most websites. It’s available for Firefox and Chrome.

Updates

If your browser tells you that there is an update available and suggests that you download it then I would recommend doing so. This is because at least part of the update is likely to involve improved security for your browser. Remember that the browser’s job is to communicate with other computers, passing data to and from your own machine. This is precisely the area where people with bad intent will try to exploit weaknesses. Therefore, it is important that as soon as a flaw in your browser is discovered and rectified, you should incorporate that rectification as soon as possible by updating your browser.

As far as updating plugins is concerned, you probably often see nagging screens advising you to update Adobe Flash Player. Annoying though they are, I would suggest complying as the update may very well be to do with security. Likewise, if you see nagging messages about updating Java then I would comply for the same reason (Java is powerful programming installed on your own computer that websites call upon to add bells and whistles to their web pages).

Default Browser

If you have more than one browser installed then opening one up may cause a message to be displayed along the lines of “SuperDuper browser is not currently your default browser. Make it the default?”

The “default browser” is the one that loads up when a browser is called for, but none has been specified. Suppose, for instance, that you have a web page saved on your computer. This will probably be an “html” file. If you double-click on that file then your operating system looks for the “default program” (in this case a “default browser”) to open that file.

Obviously, there is only one “default browser” and the message above (when you start the SuperDuper browser) is really no more than your SuperDuper browser screaming “me, me, me” at you. It thinks it’s the most important browser in the universe and that it’s doing you a favour by suggesting that it should be the default browser instead of the one that you currently have as the default.

You can always change your default browser by opening up the one that you wish to be the default. If it doesn’t automatically scream at you to make it the default then look for the option to change the settings. There is bound to be a setting somewhere to make that browser the default.

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Computer Support in London
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